Group leader: Gábor Juhász

Email: juhasz.gabor[at]brc.hu

Group website:

Group members

Name

Title

 

 

Gábor JUHÁSZ

Professor

publications

CV

Áron SZABÓ

Associate professor

publications

CV

Arindam BHATTACHARJEE

Assistant professor

publications

CV

Hajnalka LACZKÓ-DOBOS

Assistant professor

publications

CV

Tamás MARUZS

Assistant professor

publications

CV

András BLASTYÁK

Research associate

publications

CV

Gábor CSORDÁS

Research associate

 

 

András JIPA

Research associate

 

 

Adél ÜRMÖSI

Junior research associate

 

 

Hussein ABUAMMAR

Junior research associate

 

 

Dalma BÖRCSÖK

PhD student

 

 

Asha Kiran MADDALI

PhD student

 

 

Enikő LAKATOS

PhD student

 

 

Aishwarya CHHATRE

PhD student

 

 

Szilvia BOZSÓ

laboratory assistant

 

 

Ildikó ERDŐDI

laboratory administrator

 

 

Erzsébet Juhász FEHÉRNÉ

scientific administrator

 

 

Gábor JUHÁSZ

Szent-Györgyi student

 

 

Research                                  

Autophagy (cellular self-digestion by lysosomes) is activated in response to starvation in all eukaryotic cells, and it ensures survival by recycling dispensable cellular constituents for re-use in synthetic processes. In animals, autophagy has been adopted to serve additional functions beyond starvation survival that include regulation of lifespan, stress responses, cellular homeostasis, cell death, immunity, cancer, neurodegeneration diseases, obesity and lipid metabolism, and more. The biomedical relevance of autophagy is well-established by now, also evident from the 2016 Nobel Prize awarded to a yeast autophagy researcher.

Our group mainly uses the popular animal model Drosophila to study the genetics, cell biology, biochemistry, and the physiological and pathological roles and mechanisms of autophagy, crinophagy (lysosomal degradation of secretory granules) and endocytosis for many years by now. More recently, we developed an interest into how all these lysosomal degradation pathways are coordinated, not only in Drosophila but also in cultured human cells.