Group leader: András Dér

Email: der.andras[at]brc.hu

Group website:

Group members


Name

Position

Publications

CV

András DÉR

Scientific advisor

publications

CV

Sándor VALKAI

Research associate

publications

CV

Balázs LEITGEB

Research associate

publications

CV

András KINCSES

Scientific administrator

publications

CV

Zoltán NÁSZTOR

Scientific administrator

publications

CV

Dániel PETROVSZKI

PhD student

publications

CV

János HORVÁTH

PhD student

publications

CV


 

Research


Bioelectronics has a double meaning in scientific literature. On the one hand, as a branch of basic biophysical sciences, it deals with electric phenomena appearing on any organization levels of living systems (A). On the other hand, as a recently developed discipline of information technological science, it is exploring chances of biological materials for application in molecular electronics (B). Important objects in both disciplines are the biological interfaces separating structural units. Our main goal is to develop novel methods on integrated micro- and nanotechnological platforms for the investigation of electric and optical phenomena at bio-interfaces, and utilize them in both branches of bioelectronic science. Besides its impact on basic biophysical science, this research is expected to have applications in various branches of molecular electronics.

 

A) Recently, we have started developing such lab-on-a-chip model systems that enable the complex biophysical characterization of biological interfaces separating adjacent organs, including the investigation of the electric impedance, transport properties, or zeta-potential of the cell layers, under continuous circulation conditions and visual monitoring (by a microscope). We carry out these activities as a joint research effort by the Biological Barriers group of the Neurobiology Unit, lead by Prof. Maria Deli.

 

B) Not only physics can help solving biological problems, but biology may also facilitate (applied) physics research. Our experimental results demonstrated the applicability special protein films as an active, programmable nonlinear optical elements of all-optical integrated circuits. Based on these findings, a USA patent [Light-driven integrated optical device (US 6,956,984 B2)] have recently been registered.

Recently, we have developed such an integrated optical biosensor, whose sensing element (a Mach_Zehnder interferometer) can be optically fine-tuned for optimal performance, via illuminating a thin protein film. Having performed successful test experiments with the device, we are working on the adaptation of the method to rapid sensing of bacteria from body fluids.

Our long-term goal is to utilize the results of our research carried out in both branches of bioelectronics, in practical applications in e.g., optoelectronics, pharmaceutic research or medical diagnostics.

 

Molecular modeling of biological interfaces

Novel theoretical concepts and related model calculations are also expected to facilitate a thorough understanding of the function of biological interfaces. A large set of experimental evidences supporting the tight connection between the structure of interfacial water and the biological function of the barrier layer have been piled up during the recent decades. In this spirit, we are performing molecular dynamics calculations to describe the interaction of biological macromolecules and water. The results of our simulations can serve as a basis of the rational design of new and effective peptide-based drugs, as well.